Sept. 04, 2013 NY MINI

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Top News
President Obama, flanked by Speaker John A. Boehner and Representative Nancy Pelosi, met with Congressional leaders at the White House on Tuesday.

House Leaders Express Their Support for Syria Strike

By MARK LANDLER, MICHAEL R. GORDON and THOM SHANKER

President Obama won the support of Republican and Democratic leaders in the House for an attack on Syria, as a Senate panel agreed on the wording for a measure to permit military action.

. Documents  Document: Senate Resolution on Syria
President Bashar al-Assad, center, at morning prayers marking the end of Ramadan last month.

Assad Wages War Shielded With a Smile

By NEIL MacFARQUHAR and BEN HUBBARD

President Bashar al-Assad’s public activities mask increasing aggression in battle and belie fears among many supporters of an American attack.

An abandoned train line in Namie, a town that was evacuated because of contamination from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant.

Errors Cast Doubt on Japan’s Cleanup of Nuclear Accident Site

By MARTIN FACKLER

Analysts are questioning whether Japan’s government and the operator of the stricken Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant have the expertise and ability to manage the crisis.

. Graphic  Graphic: Attempts to Control Contamination by Radioactivity in Fukushima
. Photographs Slide Show: Inside Fukushima’s Evacuation Zone
For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »
Editors’ Picks

DINING & WINE

Video Feature VIDEO FEATURE: At the Critics’ TablePast and present restaurant critics for The New York Times discuss the food, the star rating system and the tricks to eating anonymously.

OPINION | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR

The Limits of Nullification

By ROBERT A. LEVY

On issues like gun control, the states are not powerless in the face of federal law, but there are limits to what they can do to prevent enforcement of constitutionally valid regulation.

QUOTATION OF THE DAY

“Water keeps building up inside the plant, and debris keeps piling up outside of it. This is all just one big shell game aimed at pushing off the problems until the future.”

KIYOSHI KUROKAWA, who led an investigation into the nuclear accident at the Fukushima plant in Japan.

World
Allies’ Intelligence Differs on Details, but Still Points to Assad Forces

By DAVID E. SANGER and ERIC SCHMITT

The United States and its allies differ on some intelligence estimates when it comes to chemical weapons use in Syria, but all agree that only the Assad government had the means to launch attacks.

Diplomatic Security Must Be Priority at State Dept., Panel Says

By ERIC SCHMITT

An independent review concluded that the State Department office overseeing diplomatic security is mired in the agency’s sprawling bureaucracy and must be elevated in importance.

Egypt Speeds Use of Trials for Jailing of Islamists

By DAVID D. KIRKPATRICK

An administrative court also banned four satellite networks considered sympathetic to supporters of the ousted president, Mohamed Morsi.

For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »

U.S.
Jordan Sachs-Amrami at Temple Isaiah in Los Angeles, which has been experimenting with the bar mitzvah process.

Bar Mitzvahs Get New Look to Build Faith

By LAURIE GOODSTEIN

American Jews often view the coming-of-age ceremony as an ending. A new initiative by the Reform movement is out to change that.

Ariel Castro in the courtroom during the sentencing phase in Cleveland last month.

Man Who Held Ohio Women Captive Is Found Dead

By MICHAEL SCHWIRTZ

Ariel Castro, who was sentenced to life in prison for holding three women captive in his Cleveland home for a decade, was found hanging in his prison cell, officials said.

In Fresno, Calif., a new gravestone lists 28 Mexican victims of a plane crash, unidentified for 65 years.

65 Years Later, a Memorial Gives Names to Crash Victims

By MALIA WOLLAN

Twenty-eight Mexican victims of a plane crash in 1948 were memorialized in Fresno, Calif., with a new gravestone that lists their names.

 

Politics
Jeb Bush signing copies of his latest book,

Bushes Focus on Immigration Debate to Reclaim Their Influence

By ASHLEY PARKER

An overhaul of immigration laws is an issue critical to protecting the family legacy, and has been a defining issue for the Bushes for decades.

Secretary of State John F. Kerry, center, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel, right, and Gen. Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, on Tuesday.

Officials Make Case for Strike Before Senate Panel

By THOM SHANKER and MICHAEL R. GORDON

Two secretaries and the chairman of the Joint Chiefs sought to persuade senators on the Foreign Relations Committee to support military action against Syria.

Dr. Francis Collins, the director of the National Institutes of Health, with President Obama. Dr. Collins called 2013 the

Budget Battles Keep Agencies Guessing

By ANNIE LOWREY

The combination of cuts and a breakdown in the budgeting process leaves offices reluctant to hire or to commit to big projects.

For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »

Business
Steven A. Ballmer, left, Microsoft's chief executive, with Stephen Elop, the chief executive of Nokia who will rejoin Microsoft with the acquisition.

In Nokia, Microsoft Bets on Apple-Like Revival

By NICK WINGFIELD

Microsoft’s predicament recalls the situation Apple found itself in during the early 1990s, with high-quality products overlooked in the marketplace.

Eduardo Porter

ECONOMIC SCENE

Business Losing Clout in a G.O.P. Moving Right

By EDUARDO PORTER

Scholars have proposed many reasons for the diminished role businesses have with Congressional Republicans, and, yes, it’s about money.

Construction for a shopping mall at Leipziger Platz in Berlin.

No Bounce for Europe in Rebound by Germany

By JACK EWING

The crisis has weakened ties in the euro zone as German companies, with the government cheering them on, look to China and the United States.

For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »

Technology
Shedding Handsets, Nokia Looks to the Future

By MARK SCOTT and BRIAN X. CHEN

Nokia, despite the sale of its handset unit to Microsoft, will still be in business with two major technology components: networking and mapping.

BITS BLOG

Bad News for BlackBerry in the Microsoft-Nokia Marriage

By IAN AUSTEN

Now that Microsoft has thrown its financial muscle behind Nokia, BlackBerry is left to find another suitor.

Stephen Elop will step down as Nokia's chief and head an expanded devices team at Microsoft.

From Nokia, an Executive Who Knows the Difficulties at Hand

By QUENTIN HARDY

As Nokia’s chief, Stephen Elop took harsh measures to right the company, preventing an even worse outcome, analysts say. But Nokia has not yet halted its slide in market share.

For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »

Sports
Members of Admiral, one of two new teams in the Kontinental Hockey League, listened to their coach during a training session in August.

To Vladivostok and Beyond

By STEVEN LEE MYERS

Despite its turbulent history and uncertain finances, the Kontinental Hockey League, based in Russia, is set to open its sixth season with 28 teams in 8 nations and 9 time zones.

Lleyton Hewitt, 32, a former No. 1, during his five-set loss to Mikhail Youzhny in the fourth round Tuesday.

ON TENNIS

A Lesson in Adjusting to Lower Expectations

By CHRISTOPHER CLAREY

Lleyton Hewitt, like Roger Federer, is 32 and was once No. 1 in the world, but he has moved on from those increasingly distant days and found meaning at a new, lower level.

. Straight Sets: Federer Paid Price for Not Adjusting His Game Plan
Southern California filming practice for internal use. Teams often trade game film, but not all colleges are willing to share.

Playing Detective in Finding Films of Opponents

By JORGE ARANGURE Jr.

Video coordinators must navigate the rules for exchanging game films that can turn their profession into an alchemy of dogged legwork of a detective and the backslapping of a car salesperson.

. Upset Binge Boosts a Supposedly Lower College Division
For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

Arts
The new lineup of the Pixies, from left: Kim Shattuck, David Lovering, Black Francis and Joey Santiago.

Pixies Motor On, With New Bassist

By BEN SISARIO

The Pixies are releasing a new EP and going on tour, without the beloved Kim Deal, who announced a few weeks ago that she was leaving the band.

David Williamson's play

A Scandal-Scalded Murdoch as a Song-and-Dance Man

By WILLIAM GRIMES

Rupert Murdoch’s many missteps get stage treatments in Australia and Britain.

Josephine Cogdell Schuyler on her roof in Harlem.

Crossing the Lines Dividing the Races

By JENNIFER SCHUESSLER

White women who became denizens of black neighborhoods and culture during the Harlem Renaissance are the subject of Carla Kaplan’s “Miss Anne in Harlem.”

For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »

N.Y./Region
Among the Democratic candidates at a rancorous mayoral debate on Tuesday night were, from left, William C. Thompson Jr., Bill de Blasio and Christine C. Quinn. The primary is next week.

With Little Time Left, Mayoral Candidates Pounce on de Blasio

By MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUM and MICHAEL BARBARO

Rivals hammered Bill de Blasio, depicting him as a panderer to the real estate industry, a flip-flopper and a naïve dreamer whose plans would wilt in the face of reality.

. Video  Video: The Final Debate
Vito J. Lopez

Disgraced in Albany, and Vying for Council

By JOSEPH BERGER

Vito J. Lopez, who resigned as an assemblyman after a sexual harassment scandal, may have a fair chance of winning in an off-the-radar election for New York’s City Council.

Noel Korman, right, and other skaters have helped to renovate Riverside Skate Park, at Riverside Drive near 108th Street.

Preserving a Skateboarding Park and Its Creator’s Memory

By COREY KILGANNON

Riverside Skate Park was designed in the 1990s by the New York skateboarding pioneer Andy Kessler, who died in 2009. But it had fallen into disrepair until friends of Mr. Kessler took on a refurbishing project in his honor.

For more New York news, go to NYTimes.com/NewYork »
Obituaries
Frederik Pohl in 2009.

Frederik Pohl, Science Fiction Master Who Vaporized Utopias, Dies at 93

By GERALD JONAS

Mr. Pohl, who grew up in Brooklyn, edited magazines and books before finding renown as a writer. Perhaps the most famous of his novels was “The Space Merchants.”

 

 

Revelation 19:16 On his robe and on his thigh he has this name written: KING OF KINGS AND LORD OF LORDS. This blog is to present Up To Date Prophetic News. My prayer is that this blog will bring others to know Jesus as their Savior if they do not know him the King of Kings and Lord of Lords.

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Posted in 2013, AMERICA, Forewarned, INTERNATIONAL, Signs of the Times, WORLDNEWS

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