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aug. 11 14 NY MINI

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Parachute riggers for the United States Army prepared water to be airdropped over Iraq.

Iraq Airstrikes May Continue for Months, Obama Says

By MICHAEL D. SHEAR and TIM ARANGO

President Obama sought to prepare Americans for an extended presence in the skies over Iraq, telling reporters that the airstrikes he ordered this week, and which continued on Saturday, could go on for months.

Doctors Without Borders workers at an Ebola treatment center in Guinea in April, shortly after the virus was recognized.

Tracing Ebola’s Breakout to an African 2-Year-Old

By DENISE GRADY and SHERI FINK

The current Ebola outbreak, the largest ever, seems likely to surpass all previous known Ebola outbreaks combined, and epidemiologists predict it will take months to control.

Senator John Cornyn of Texas, left, said Republicans would have to

Uniting to Take Congress, G.O.P. Tries to Become the Party of ‘Yes’

By CARL HULSE

Party leaders say that Republicans will need to be realistic about what they can achieve and that a high level of party unity will be essential.

World
Women prepared lunch Saturday in Grabovo, near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17.

Ukraine Strategy Bets on Restraint by Russia

By ANDREW E. KRAMER

Despite growing jitters in the West, Ukraine’s military leaders said they were making a well-calculated gamble, betting that Vladimir V. Putin of Russia felt he had too much to lose to invade.

An entrepreneur has acquired about half of a neighborhood north of the Marais, a trendy part of Paris, with plans to restyle it into a fine-food district called La Jeune Rue, or Young Street.

An Epicurean Village Is Too Rich for Some Paris Appetites

By LIZ ALDERMAN

An entrepreneur aims to transform a working-class district into a high-concept gastronomic haven, but critics foresee the rise of another bourgeoisie enclave.

Fishermen in Da Nang. On a two-day trip from that port, a Vietnamese vessel encountered some 70 Chinese ships.

A View From the Sea, as China Flexes Muscle

By AUSTIN RAMZY

A two-and-a-half month standoff over a Chinese oil rig illustrated the long reach of China’s nautical ambitions.

For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »

U.S.
The Air Force Academy campus near Colorado Springs.

Informant Debate Renewed as Air Force Revisits Cadet Misconduct

By DAVE PHILIPPS

The announcement of an investigation into misconduct by student athletes at the United States Air Force Academy reopened questions about a discontinued informant program.

Avalon is the only city on California's Catalina Island, which has spent millions to revive tourism but, with limited water sources, is requiring businesses and homes to reduce use by 25 percent.

Soaking Up Catalina, Tourists Pose a Dilemma

By IAN LOVETT

Twenty-two miles across the sea, California’s Catalina Island, once starved for tourists, must now welcome them cautiously during a drought.

Suman Chandra checking marijuana plants at a federal marijuana facility at the University of Mississippi in Oxford.

Medical Marijuana Research Hits Wall of U.S. Law

By SERGE F. KOVALESKI

Though more than one million people are thought to use marijuana to treat ailments, there are few rigorous studies showing whether the drug is effective.

 

 

Politics

McCain Says Limited U.S. Strikes on Militants in Iraq Are Not Enough

By JONATHAN WEISMAN

Senator John McCain said he would favor sending combat air controllers into Iraq to help identify airstrike targets and expand the operation into Syria.

President Obama talked about Iraq at the White House on Saturday. He has yet to detail a plan for rolling back ISIS' gains.

News Analysis

As ISIS Militants Exert Their Control, U.S. Pursues a Military Middle Road

By MICHAEL R. GORDON

In carrying out limited airstrikes, the United States is trying to contain the threat posed by Islamic militants but not break their hold on northern and western Iraq.

Justice Sharon Lee

Despite Failure, Campaign to Oust Tennessee Justices Keeps Conservatives Hopeful

By ALAN BLINDER

The effort to remove three jurists from the State Supreme Court swayed voters despite having no single rallying issue – an encouraging development for activists targeting the judiciary.

For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »

Business

Fair Game

A Corporate Tax Break That’s Closer to Home

By GRETCHEN MORGENSON

By allowing a telecom company to spin off part of itself into a real estate investment trust, the I.R.S. has opened a window to a way for many corporations to have lower tax bills.

An Airbus A380, by far the world's largest commercial passenger plane, at the 2014 Farnborough International Airshow in England last month. Only one airline - Emirates - has made the plane a central element of its global strategy.

Oversize Expectations for the Airbus A380

By JAD MOUAWAD

Why is the giant A380 jet wowing passengers, but not many airlines? Its maker may have made the wrong bet on air travel’s future.

Anat Admati, at a Senate committee hearing last month. She says banks must be forced to reduce sharply their reliance on borrowed money.

When She Talks, Banks Shudder

By BINYAMIN APPELBAUM

In a quest for tougher rules on banking, Anat R. Admati, an industry gadfly, is rapidly gaining a broader audience.

For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »

Technology
George Orwell

Bits Blog

Dispute Between Amazon and Hachette Takes an Orwellian Turn

By DAVID STREITFELD

In an open letter to readers, the retailer cited George Orwell in its fight with the publisher Hachette over e-book pricing, but it may have undermined its own argument.

In the mobile game

Bits Blog

Living Like the Kardashians, via Smartphone

By JENNA WORTHAM

A fantasy game, “Kim Kardashian: Hollywood,” pushes players to build their own celebrity and business prowess.

Bletchley Park has received visits from the likes of Kate Middleton, the Duchess of Cambridge. Her grandmother worked there during World War II.

Bits Blog

At Bletchley Park, a Reminder About the History of Cracking Codes

By J. D. BIERSDORFER

Bletchley Park, once Britain’s highly classified government center for code breaking during World War II, now invites curious guests who want to poke around and learn its secrets.

For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »

Sports
Rickie Fowler after missing a putt in the third round of the P.G.A. Championship.

Toning Down His Wardrobe and Letting His Play Do the Talking

By BILL PENNINGTON

Rickie Fowler has taken a serious approach to the major championships this year, putting the focus on the scorecard rather than his formerly vivid style of dress.

For his second shot on the second hole, Jason Day rolled up his pants and removed his shoes to wade across Floyds Fork and hit out of weeds.

P.G.A. Championship 2014: Thinking on His Bare Feet, Jason Day Salvages a Peculiar Par

By BILL FIELDS

Jason Day managed to save par, and his chances at a breakthrough, after hitting across Floyds Fork and wading across to play the ball out of the weeds.

Deion Sanders at a practice for Truth, a youth sports program he founded, at Prime Prep in Dallas.

Sports of The Times

A Star-Powered School Sputters

By MICHAEL POWELL

With its academics and its finances under fire, the Texas sports academy created by Deion Sanders, the Hall of Fame cornerback and N.F.L. commentator, faces the loss of its state charter.

For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

Arts

A Cultural Leap

Life of Wonderment

By MELENA RYZIK

The artist Swoon blurs the line between where her artworks end and her activism begins.

Cate Blanchett, foreground, as Claire and Isabelle Huppert as Solange in a scene from

Theater Review | ‘The Maids’

Classy Dames in Desperate Straits

By BEN BRANTLEY

Cate Blanchett and Isabelle Huppert engage in intense, whiplash physicality in a rip-roaring production of the Jean Genet play “The Maids,” directed by Benedict Andrews, at City Center.

Victor Maymudes and Bob Dylan in 1964 in Woodstock, N.Y.

A Dylan Insider’s Back Pages

By SAM TANENHAUS

A new memoir, “Another Side of Bob Dylan,” features stories from a longtime sidekick of the musician’s, offering a glimpse behind the scenes before a bitter fallout in 1997.

For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »

N.Y./Region
Baby photos at Dr. Mark V. Sauer's office in Midtown Manhattan were moved out of public view to comply with the law.

Baby Pictures at Doctor’s? Cute, Sure, but Illegal

By ANEMONA HARTOCOLLIS

The “baby wall” at obstetricians’ and midwives’ offices is gradually going the way of cigars in the waiting room, because of the federal patient privacy law known as Hipaa.

Nat Nakasa in Harlem.

After Decades in Exile, a South African Writer’s Remains Will Head Home

By DANIEL MASSEY

Almost 50 years after Nat Nakasa, a black South African writer who railed against the injustices of apartheid, died in New York City, his remains will be returned to his home country.

Credit: nytimes.com

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Revelation 19:16
On his robe and on his thigh he has this name written: KING OF KINGS AND LORD OF LORDS.
This blog is to present Up To Date Prophetic News. My prayer is that this blog will bring others to know Jesus as their Savior if they do not know him the King of Kings and Lord of Lords.

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